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Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
of his deputies vacationing in paris. if you went back to baghdad, you'd be arrested. >> uh, no. nobody will arrest me. they will kill me. [ticking] [camera shutter snaps] >> these surveillance photos were taken by undercover police officers while they watched a team of seven south american thieves clean out an old navy store. >> shirts at $22.50, and they got the whole rack. >> when police moved in to make the arrest, they found enough merchandise to fill a room. all taken in less than an hour without anyone inside the store noticing a thing. [ticking] >> we have never seen a problem of this size and magnitude in world history. >> now hang on. in world history. >> there's more counterfeiting going on in china now than we've ever seen anywhere. >> name an american brand. any brand. any kind of product. just name it, and we'll tell you something about it. it's probably being counterfeited in china as we speak. >> this is the most profitable criminal venture, as far as i know, on earth. >> counterfeiting. >> counterfeiting and your partners don't kill you. >> welcome to 60 minutes on cnbc
would never forget. i shipped off to paris island and this is where i would spend my eighteenth birthday. happy birthday. it is not as bad as the next we birthdays because my nineteenth birthday i was in sniper school, my 22 birthday i was in mountain training in bridgecourt, i have a lot of good birthdays. in paris island, shipped to north carolina infantry training and after that went to hawaii where i was stationed the next three years and this is where i attended sniper school. after attending sniper school i shipped to iraq and in iraq i didn't get to complete my floor because i was bitten on my right hand by vicious enemy spider and suffered severe nerve damage but i will let everyone in the room know that the enemy will stop at nothing. they even train spiders. i turned back home for two years of dismal training and working up to get my hands back and this is why i became a sniper team leader under 500 marines and we were training to go back to iraq. we need five volunteers to go to afghanistan. i said what is the mission? we don't know yet. we just need five volunteers right now.
and mcconnell to actually sit together. >> it was like arranging the paris pease talks or the camp david talks. it wasn't easy. >> were they as uncomfortable as they looked sitting next to each other? >> yes. >> and what did you learn from that? >> well, i think that -- what can you say? they don't strike me as two guys that are -- can sit down in a room over a whiskey and kind of work things out. they're very locked in their ways and they are both political tacticians. that's what they do. >> they are brilliant political tacticians. anybody who knows senator mcconnell and reid knows that. they're both very good at what they do, and outmaneuvering one another, which raises the question, with no personal relationship and they're so politically far apart and beholden to their interests in the party, why should we expect that compromise will happen? >> i think that the future of the party, republican party very much depends on getting away from this view held by some in the public that they're just obstructionists. the other thing is that there are just too many things that are really impor
to meet with parties in paris to start peace negotiations. it was successful in that matter to yes? >> this is a question about the relationships between the two successive first ladies, jacqueline bouvier kennedy and labor johnson. i seem to remember, jackie kennedy referred to mrs. johnson is lyndon johnson's trained hunting dog at one point, to which i feel, i would rather have a trained hunting dog rather than a french poodle if you want to get something done. but there are many pictures of lyndon johnson and bill signing ceremonies. i'm wondering about that. >> mrs. johnson hosted a reception for the new senate wives in 1953 after the kennedys were married. mrs. kennedy certainly stood out as a glamorous and intelligent young cenobite. they knew each other a decade for the assassination. during the vice presidential period, mrs. johnson was asked to substitute for mrs. kennedy at events, dinners, receptions, teas, events, and she did so. i don't think they were close, personally, or socially, but they had inimical relationship. mrs. johnson visited the kennedy compound at hyan
's dwindling shark population. we will show you. >>> the sharks at a paris aquarium had a surprise visitor. a world champion free diver jumped this shark tank. he is crazy. he said he was afraid of sharks for years but able to overcome the fear by what else regularly swimming with them. the event was to draw attention to the dwindling shark population. it is a reminder that many people see them as cold-blood killers and many others see them as animals that need protection. the swam with 16 black-tipped sharks, four gray sharks, two zebra sharks. not a great white. he's a chicken. thank you for watching nbc bay area news. chris matthews is next. good night. [ laughter ] [ girl ] wow, you guys have it easy. i wish i had u-verse when i was your age. in my day, we didn't have these fancy wireless receivers. blah blah blah. if i had a sleepover, i couldn't just move the tv into the playroom. no. we had to watch movies in the den because that's where the tv outlet was. and if dad was snoring on the couch, we muscled through it. is she for real? your generation has it made. [ male announcer ] the
time. the bob cat worker in north dakota pay as higher tax rate than paris hilton because she doesn't earn her income. he just lets her money make her money. we need to figure out a way to equalize those rates. maybe not to make them identical but to equalize them. when mitt romney pays 15% and the average american mied family pays much higher, there is something with the tax code and that needs to be fixed. >> what about going back to the old race, going back to the wealthiest americans paying almost 50%? what do you think about that? you need to look at on what kind of income. to me the discussion is more about rates, what do we apply those rates to and how do we equalize people who make a lot of money on -- >> how did you say about houm wear. . >> there's good and bad in the health care law. we need to keep the good parts. a lot of people thought you should run away from it. i said, wait a minute, there's some really good things that need to move on. health care is way too important to politicize it the way it's been politicize z the lar year opinion. >> what advise would you giv
, missiles are being shot indiscriminately against civilians. not in london, not in paris and not in washington. >> no rational person would disagree that the rocket firing has got to stop. it is a senseless activity that can only lead to more bloodshed. however, as i said to prime minister netanyahu when i sat down with him in jerusalem last year, this clear repression, oppression, whatever you want to call it on the gaza strip, these people are desperate and when there are desperate people with desperate policy and no hope, they often turn to terrorist groups whether to foment their fury and anger. where does this terrible cycle end? what is the constructive way through this? >> i want to make something perfectly clear. hamas are the enemies of peace. not just the enemies of israel. they are the enemies of peace, regional stability in the region, and to peace both internally on the palestinian side and between palestinians and israel. they don't recognize israel as a state. they want to annihilate us. and in the sense, instead of really building, you say okay, you have g
pays a higher tax rate than paris hilton, because she doesn't earn her income. she just lets her money make her money. and we need to figure out a way to equalize those rates. maybe not make them identical, but to equalize them. because this tax structure, when mitt romney pays 15% and the average american, middle class family, pays much higher, there is something wrong with the tax code. and that needs to be fixed. >> what about going back to the old rates? going back to the wealthiest americans, paying almost 40%. what about that? >> i think that, you know, you need to take a look at on what kind of income. to me the discussion is more about rates. it's about what do we apply those rates to and how do we equalize people who make a lot of money on exhale gains versus people who go to work every day and help this economy grow. >> you know, i was back home. i saw the commercials. president obama's not the most popular guy on the prairie. and they were really going after him on obama care. how did you get around that and get the victory. what did you say about obama care? >> well, as you
. adams was the american minister to the court of st. james. jefferson the american minister to paris. jefferson made a tremendous contribution. he sent to his friend madison over 200 books on political thought, political history. my surmise is that some of those books must have been about the dutch federation. jefferson was not there. he did get his hands on a copy very quickly of the constitution. we e-mailed a copy for him over in paris. he said, where is the bill of rights? the answer was, there is no bill of rights. every people on earth is entitled by nature to a bill of rights which protect them against their government. this foreshadowed a problem. george mason was one of the members of the virginia delegation. he had written the declaration of the rights for the state of virginia in 1776. it was a few months before jefferson wrote the declaration of independence. when the convention was over, mason, who was a member of the virginia delegation, was a member of the virginia delegation, would not sign the constitution. washington was infuriated. so came about one of the great in
sit together. >> it was like arranging the paris peace talks or the camp david talks. it wasn't easy. >>> a computer security software billionaire is on the run. police want to question john mcafee in the murder of his neighbor. >> what do you think he's capable of doing? >> i don't know what he's capable of doing. >> "sky fall" came in number one this weekend with $88 million, about a spy who fights terrorists and sleeps with a lot of women. critics are calling it well made while david petraeus is calling it relatable. >> i'm charlie rose with gayle king and norah o'donnell. it was an overnight bombshell, a new twist in the sex scandal that forced cia director david petraeus to quit.al john the top u.s. commander in afghanistan, general john allen fbi is unvaer investigation. the fbi connected him to the woman who first blew the whistle senior cor on this case. john miller former assistant mer fbi as fbi director joins us here. good morning again. >> >> good morning. >> so why was this fbi agent that knew joe kelley thrown off >> the case or was he? well,
just been thrown out. >> reporter: by the time the air france concord lifted off from paris, its left wing was already on fire. it was july 25th, 2000. 109 passengers and crew had only minutes to live. the plane crashed into a hotel, killing four more people on the ground. turns out a 16-inch metal strip lying on the runway brought down the concord. >> when the concord went over it, it hit the tire to a point where it then exploded. parts of the tire then went up into the fuel tank like shrapnel. >> reporter: the flying debris exploded the concord's fuel tanks. the metal piece that triggered the accident had fallen off a continental dc-10 and had been mistakenly installed by a continental mechanic. >> this was an accident. why the french courts got involved and tried to make a criminal case out of this, i will never understand. >> reporter: french courts held continental airlines criminally responsible and convicted its mechanic of manslaughter. but now a french appeals court has overturned that ruling, saying the mistake made by the continental mechanic did not amount to a crime. the
that some successful couple in long island should pay more taxes. dagen: preventing kids like paris hilton for being wealthy down the road so we do not have to look at them. charles: nobody cares about taxes when they are making investments. dagen: number one read story is tax moves you need to make right now before the end of the year. connell: there you go. thank you, charles. dagen: america and record numbers now going online to buy holiday gifts. connell: this tax battle on capitol hill that we have been talking about. the judge says there should be no discussion on taxes at all. we will get to the judge. first of all, let's take a look at the markets. let's take a look at currency. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] help brazil reduce its overall reliance on foreign imports with the launch of the country's largest petchemical operation. ♪ when emerson takes up the challenge, "it's nev been done before" simply bemes consider it solved. emerson. ♪ emerson. [ camera flash ] great... were you profitable last month? how much money is in your checking account? have the browns paid you for t
or paris or korea, and you start pointing out that no, we're not as good, it will create a sense of maybe shaking the complacency, which i think is the first step. there is a complacency here that people -- opinion leaders and people that have more disproportionate influence, don't view their own kids' plight as bad at all. and we need to create some awareness, i think, as john said, through information that this is a serious challenge for our country and it's, you sadly it's changing who we are as a nation and we're losing our competitive edge because of it as well. >> and this project under way, a really good one, and then also the common assessment to bring it right down to the kid level, how your child is doing in relation to these rigorous and we hope world class standards, will certainly give people information. at the same time, however, if you've got a smug suburban constituency and the teachers in those schools are also grumping that the politicians and the policymakers are making their life harder, threatening their jobs, giving them too much to do, narrowing the curriculum. >>
as well as in washington and paris that algeria could be used to play a constructive role in this anticipated military intervention should it materialize. however, officials and observers within the region are -- [inaudible] and perhaps we can touch on some of this in the q&a. thank you. [applause] >> thank you very much. thank you very much, alexis, you helped us understand, perhaps, the dog that didn't bark and perhaps gave us a framework for understanding whether that'll be true in the future, and you laid out really an uncertain path ahead and helped illuminate the inner relationship between domestic politics and regional security concern. we'll wrap our panel here with two overviews, um, the first provided by dr. paul sullivan who also joined us for the last panel. dr. sullivan is going to give us an economic sort of toward the horizon of the region and help us understand some of the sparks that help drive change and may yet derail it. dr. sullivan? >> well, i'm not sure i would agree that that dog may not bark sometime in the future. algeria had its problems in the e
had been there for and what she had nurtured us for. >> narrator: the mission in paris was leaderless. someone needed to turn it around, pull it all together. mitt took over. >> he immediately starts kind of establishing himself as a leader within the church because there's a vacuum. >> narrator: those closest to him say the experience had changed him. >> he made a commitment to himself to work as hard. and i think part of that comes from that experience of going overseas and seeing other people, and having life-threatening experiences and deciding that you're going to-what you're going to make out of your life. and he decided he wanted to make the most he could out of his life, and worked as hard as he possibly could to do that. >> narrator: by the early 1980s, barry obama had left hawaii and his grandparents behind. now he was on the mainland, in los angeles, at occidental college. they called it oxy. >> he was the most casual, unpretentious, nicest guy. i mean, my indelible image of him was always in a hawaiian shirt, and some op shorts and flip-flops. i don't know that he had a lo
everyone has a shot. parents, you have got to paris. students, you have got to study. but do not tell me that hiring more teachers will not help the country grow. do not tell me that students should just borrow money -- more money from their parents. that was not an option for me, maybe not for a lot of you. that is why the change i want to bring is to cut tuition and have, make college more affordable. i want 100,000 new math and science teachers. i want to train 2 million americans at community colleges for the jobs people are hiring for right now. that is my plan. that is the america we are fighting for. [cheers and applause] change. change comes when we live up to this country's innovation. i could not be prouder of the american workers and american ingenuity when i bet on the automotive industry. they are not going back to just building cars, we are building better cars. because of technology, because of innovation. cars that we are building now by the middle of the next decade will go trice as far. that will save you money. it will help our national security. it will help our envir
's not the american farmer. >> a poster child for the estate tax would be paris hilton, celebrity, but also hotel repair res. >> currently the federal government taxes estates worth $5 million and up at 35%. when the bush era tax cuts expire in january, rates increase to 55% on estates of a million dollars or more. while some republicans want to eliminate the death tax entirely, the president proposes a 45% rate on estates of $3.5 million and up. >> if we are burdened with millions of dollars of estate tax, it forces the breakup of ranches and farms and it's not good for the environment. it's not good for future generations and it's not good for america in general. >> he paid the irs $2 million when he inherited the ranch decades ago. come january, the tax burden on his children would be more than 13 million. critics say 97% of family farms could be affected by the tax increase. supporters disagree and they argue the tax is needed to tax unrealized capital gains that are handed down family to family. the point is, estate tax is just another boulder in the fiscal cliff prepared to fall. back to yo
because it is paris up of. -- because it is perishable. in the senate, cooler heads prevailed and they were able to construct a deal that included farm programs and nutrition programs. host: george tweets in and says -- guest: i think it is a steep fiscal slope, i do not think it is a cliff. we do not want to do that. if we saw unemployment go up 1.5 or two points, the deficit go back up, maybe the democrats would benefit and the republicans would get trounced in 2014. on the other hand, all of money and politics in the 24-hour media, who knows politically what would happen if that were the case? as a partisan i might agree with the caller, but as a patriot, i think we need to get this matter resolved. host: idaho, mark, an independent college. good morning, marc. welcome, you are on the air. caller: sorry. thanks for having me on. i had a quick comment. i think a lot of the hate and discontent going on in washington right now is being fuelled by our attention being misdirected or misplaced. the taxation side of the question is interesting, but is basically, who is going to pa
's only fair to say, you said yesterday, to see in paris right now. he's basically tell his students that everything that happens of the next few months will be studied for many, many years. all the main players are facing tests right now. civilians a dying. the power balance is shifting under our feed and no one knows where it will end up. thank you for your time, your contribution. [applause] >> in a few moments senate leaders harry reid and mitch mcconnell on a possible change to set rules regarding the filibuster. forty-five minutes chief justice john roberts and the supreme court and constitutional law. after that, part of our coverage of the halifax international security forum, including a look at the u.s. role in global politics and the situation in syria. several live events tell you about tomorrow morning. former florida governor jeb bush will be speaking at the foundation for excellence in education. you can once that event here on c-span2 at 845 eastern. just after that at 9:00 a.m. eastern on c-span three the foreign policy initiative begins a daylong symposium on foreig
ads comparing him to paris hilton. the partly because it was mostly the standard democratic agenda of reversing the bush era and investing in the future. obama cares a lot about policy, but it's not really a policy entrepreneur in the original campaign wasn't really about new ideas. it's about that that message of change and then this aspirational, we can believe in addendum, the same but maybe this guy would follow through on the old ideas that never seem to go anywhere. and he really has. i was on a panel in boston before the election with a guy named charlie baker who is a republican. he ran for governor in 2010 and got hasted by duval patrick here to see republican who lost that year. but he had read my book and he said his take away was to stuff, whether you're on the right or the left and i do think that is an implicit message of this book. i get asked all the time at events like this, how did obama screwed the politics about? how come people think the stimulus created jobs think that elvis is alive, which is actually true. it was first of all say that this black guy whose mi
the estate tax. i would like to see the estate tax come back. i do not think paris hilton should inherit her parents will wealth. the estate tax has been part of american economics for almost 100 years, republicans and democrats have been for it. it is not socialism. it is part of the american way of doing things. let's get to those compromises which are out there. i think we will get an amt patch, and medicare passed for doctors, some closing of loopholes. i will like to see a radical simplification of our tax code but i do not see it happening. i think that would be too much to ask. on foreign-policy, i think we will see more interesting things. we will get out of afghanistan. that does not take a genius to predict that. but i see an opening to cuba. -- under this president, pretty soon. i think it will start this year. it is not going to be the kind of rabid, you are a communist opposition that has kept american presidents from doing that. some of the most interesting thing to watch after this election we did what happens with israeli american relations? benjamin netanyahu did something i
said that he is teaching in paris right now. it telling his students that everything that happens he will be setting for many years from now. all the main players are facing tests right now. the power balance is shifting. nobody knows where it will and debt. thank you for your time and contribution. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> as negotiations continue over avoiding the fiscal cliff, auntie's family will go back to august of 2007 and look at how we got here. they created the spending cuts that are said to take effect in january along with some tax revisions. >> if you listen to mayor bloomberg he said the damage was unprecedented. then maybe the worst storm they have ever faced. gov. christie said the damage was unthinkable. we had heard case predict hurricane force winds -- we had hurricane force wind. you start to get a sense of the massive scope of this storm. i have read dozens of stories about halt many consumers, only tied to people was through their smart phone, linking up social
. it is ridiculous. we are in 2012. the first children's hospital was founded in 18 02 in paris. they've recognized then that children were not the same as adults. why are we ostriches and have our head in the stand? you could excuse it up until the end of the second world war. people went straight from school and work probably of the age of 14 and there was no choice. there was not at and between group. since the '50s, since all this, since my age group, what is the bloody excuse? [laughter] all i can say is, i think this is something you will do in your country very quickly, because what i love about america is the thing, we can do this, we will do it, we will make it work and we will donate. these are your teenagers. they need your support. they are your community and they are your future. you deserve to have it better. [applause] >> i just have one or two. what inspired you to set up the teenager and young adult cancer center? why there? >> mainly because i was doing a charity show and someone's back garden. rebecca was doing it for autism. and another teenage program. at that party dr. david f
. it's only fair to say, you said yesterday, to see in paris right now. he's basically tell his students that everything that happens of the next few months will be studied for many, many years. all the main players are facing tests right now. civilians a dying. the power balance is shifting under our feed and no one knows where it will end up. thank you for your time, your contribution.
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)

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